New book shows how great creatives make things happen

22/Nov/2006

A new book is aiming to redefine creative marketing communications for the 21st century and shows how personal communications and creatives can transform marketing campaigns and how great communicators make things happen.

Written by creativity and communications expert Andy Green, ‘Effective Personal Communications Skills for Public Relations’, offers thought-leadership on key issues in modern marketing and personal communications including how to manage word-of mouth, memes, branding and networking in what Green labels the ‘era of indirect communications’.

 

The new book, published by Kogan Page, was launched by Barry Sheerman MP, chair of the parliamentary committee on skills and education.

 

The book introduces a new concept of ‘personal brandcasting’ - whatever the style or manner of great communicators, they are ‘personal brandcasters’ by having a strong sense of their own personal brand, communicate in every dimension, create word-of-mouth friendly messages – or memes, and build and use strong personal networks.

 

It concludes with the examples of Jesus Christ and Onel del Guzman, the young Filipino student who allegedly created the ‘Love Bug’ virus to inspire readers on how they can combine age-old fundamentals of personal communications, coupled with new opportunities in the word-of-click era.

 

Although there are numerous books in the personal development field on how each of us is a personal brand this is believed to be a first in guiding readers on how to make their personal brands communicate and connect with the outside world – to ‘brandcast’.

 

Commenting on his new book Andy Green said: “The book aims to redefine communication practice for the 21st century. We can all transform the impact we have on our worlds by managing the way we think, act, create messages and network – our personal brandcasting.”

 

Andy Green is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and a leading expert on creativity and communications. He received the Sir Stephen Tallents medal from the Chartered Institute of Public Relations in September 2006 for services to the public relations profession.

 

He is the driving force behind the Wakefield Media and Creativity Centre, a partner with GREEN communications and creativity consultancy creativity@work. He is also author of ‘Creativity in Public Relations’ , also published by Kogan Page, and co-author of ‘A minute with Tony Blair’ inspired by a chance meeting with the Prime Minister.

 

The new book popularises and integrates the concept of ‘memes’ in mass communications and also tackles the issue of networking being regarded as the ‘Cinderella’ of marketing communications, making the call for it to be recognised as a formal marketing channel.

 

The book labels our current era as the ‘age of indirect communications’ where direct communications have failed to deliver its promise. It proposes turning around Marshall McCluhan’s famous dictum of ‘the medium is the message’ to read instead the ‘message is the medium’, because in the world of fragmented and fast-moving media channels it is the coherence of your own brand, the stickiness of your messages or memes, and how you communicate at every opportunity through your networks which now count.

 

 The book also puts forward the idea of redefining public relations for the 21st century as: ‘Public relations is about creating sustainable added value for an organisation’s reputation by managing its brand, actions, memes and networking’

 

 

The concept of a ‘parameme’ is introduced, providing an analytical tool helping communicators manage the multiple dimensions to their communications and its context.

 

Andy Green added: “The power of individuals – the power of one - being at the heart of outstanding results in mass communications is nothing new. A tidal wave of communications can stem from just one person. One person sneezes and the world can catch a cold.”

 

“It also highlights how parallel with the highly visible growth in direct marketing and communications is a less obvious, yet equally profound development in indirect communications and marketing. The inherent implicit, or non-overt nature of indirect communications has meant its significance has been largely overlooked. This book seeks to rectify this.”

‘Effective Personal Communication Skills for Public Relations’ is published by Kogan Page (ISBN 0-7494-4407-X) price £16.99

 

ENDS